Chemversation

December 27, 2009

Since the dawn of self-reflection, I have been an inert gas,
Other atoms’ interactions mocking me, as I flew past.
Every time I saw two bonding, I would quickly look away,
My full outer shell reminding, solitude is here to stay.

Looking at those lucky ions, never did I see the facts,
Never did I grasp the science, one who gives, and one who takes.
Can the atoms both be merry if their dipole is so charged?
Or do their nuclei carry hearts that shattered into shards?

I have circled a few atoms, now that I can speak their tongue:
Those with brains looked unimpressive; those with good looks sounded dumb.
Those with both were cold and distant, their electrons long since shared,
Atoms much stronger than this one waiting for their chance with her.

Now you beckon me with riddles, and all of this is so new —
Our polarity is brittle, and I don’t know what to do.
But regardless of what happens, Heisenberg remains unkind:
One of two forever present: thirst of flesh, and thirst of mind.

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Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse

January 31, 2008

I think page-turner is the term to describe Stephenie Meyer’s series: the books are almost addictive, but when you look beneath the surface you see a pretty simple story that has nothing to do with real life. Midway through the second book I got really disappointed with the author. You can’t just go back and edit the truth like that.

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As Simple As Snow

January 8, 2008

sasas.jpgFrom the first page to the very last, this book is pure sweet torture. With an overdose of mystery to begin with, the precisely adequate amount of romance, and copious goth darkness for dessert, it’s really hard to stop reading. But Galloway’s work goes far beyond disturbing. He creates enough questions to make your head explode, and then leaves you with an ending that makes your jaw drop. If you have even a tiny bit of curiosity inside you, this book will not leave your mind easily.

The novel is also a bildungsroman, following the growth of a character and culminating with the realization that he can be anything he wants to be. The story is intertwined with philosophical messages about god, death, truth, the simple and the complex.

The ambiguity of the novel had me oscillating between awe and irritation. The author is a master of questions with no answers. I wonder whether he thought of any answers for his mysteries at all. Maybe he’s just teasing his readers!

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